Posted tagged ‘PTEN’

Let’s Review: Part One

November 15, 2012

I’m writing this from my desk at our house near Seattle . . . everyone who came to Working2Walk is by now long since home and settled back into whatever routines normally fill their days.  As I look over the posts on this blog, it occurs to me that there are a couple of things left to do.  One is to say thanks again to the people who worked all year to bring this thing into being, mostly as volunteers, one or two as very poorly compensated staff.  We owe them.

Another is to sift through all this information and highlight a few places that stand out for follow up and further review.  Your list might be different from mine on that score, and I’d be love to hear about it if that’s the case.  So, starting from the beginning . . .

1. Marilyn Smith’s words from her opening remarksWe have three tools. EDUCATE, ORGANIZE, and TAKE ACTION.  As those with the most skin in the game, we need to invest ourselves in the process.  The most powerful force we have going for us, though, is BELIEF.  We want you to leave this conference with belief in the power of science, knowledge, and advocacy.

2. Dr. Os Steward’s excitement about his CTRP team’s success in finding a specific gene — called PTEN — that blocks regeneration of nerves.  When someone with his reputation for calm and caution and meticulous communication shows enthusiasm, it’s definitely catching.  I’ve gone back and put some links into that post so you can read the background material yourself if you’re interested.

3. Dr. Murray Blackmore’s sheer cleverness, determination, and most especially, youth.  I’ve heard for a long time now that SCI research used to be considered a big fat dead end to any serious career.  “You’ll waste your life trying to solve that!  Focus on something that’s actually achievable!”  That was once common advice.  And here was this sharp new mind attacking the problems with impressive ingenuity and determination.  I especially liked the part where he said that he went data-mining in cancer research about transcription factors and quickly discovered that there are 210 of them that seem to have a role in cancer growth.  When he cross-checked that list of 210 with the 12 that he knew were involved with axon growth, 11 out of 12 were on the list.  As he told us, “That means the other 199 suddenly become very interesting . . . ”  In his talk, Blackmore described his just-published research that shows transcription factors can make old neurons think they’re young and still able to regenerate, so this matters.

4. Oy.  This is going to be a long list, I can see that.  I’ll put this up as part one and keep working on the rest.